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Update on the UK Private Copying Exception

Blum_Jeremy2We reported here last month that the private copying exception, which took effect on 1 October 2014 as s.28B of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, was declared unlawful by the High Court. The court found that the evidence relied on by the government in order to introduce the exception without also providing a means of “fair compensation” to rights holders was flawed.

In a follow-up judgment, available here, the High Court formally quashed the regulations which created the private copying exception following further submissions from the parties.

Perhaps surprisingly, the regulation was quashed with the agreement of the UK government. The Secretary of State stated that the government [...]

Private Copying, an Institution Shaped by the Courts

Pablo HernandezThe progressive breakdown of the legal system regulating compensatory remuneration for private copying has given rise to some unusual cases.  We consider this to be true of a Spanish Supreme Court judgment of 6 March 2015 which had to rule on whether mobile telephones and memory cards were subject to compensatory remuneration payment, the amount of that payment and the application of the Padawan doctrine.  The legislation on which the court was to base its findings was shaky and limited to the general principle governing devices suitable for making recordings.  In view of this, the court had to decide on the royalty payable and the Padawan effect on such devices where the damages exceeded [...]

UK Private Copying Exception ruled illegal

Savvides_TheoIn October 2014 the government introduced a series of changes to the UK’s copyright regime. One change, key to the objective of making copyright law better suited to the digital age, was the introduction of a private copying exception. That exception is now in jeopardy following a successful challenge by the music industry. For the exception to survive ,the government will either have to introduce some form of compensation scheme, or produce evidence which supports its initial conclusion that private copying will cause no more than de minimis harm to copyright owners.


On 1 October 2014, a number of changes were made to the UK copyright regime in the form of new exceptions to c [...]

Ten years InfoSoc: a small note from a biased attendee to the conference

Last Friday, 13 January 2012, the conference “InfoSoc @ Ten: Ten Years after the EU Directive on Copyright in the Information Society” took place in the European Parliament. The conference, organized jointly by the IViR (University of Amsterdam) and the CRIDS (University of Namur), had an ambitious goal: to evaluate the achievements of the Information Society Directive and to discuss the next steps towards fostering creativity in the digital age (more details on the programme can be found here).

There were too many interesting (and opposite) views  being discussed, and the space available in a blog post can hardly begin to report on those.  Some  issues, however, are worthy of note. T [...]

The InfoSoc Directive Ten Years After

On May 22 of this year Directive 2001/29/EC was exactly 10 years old – a birthday largely gone unnoticed. The ‘Copyright Directive’ or ‘Information Society Directive’ (for experts: ‘InfoSoc Directive’) marked an important stage in the process of harmonization of copyright and related rights in the European Union. In contrast to earlier directives that dealt with distinct – mostly technology driven – issues , such as computer software, databases, satellite and cable television, this directive sought to harmonize the main rights and limitations in a largely technology-neutral way.
The main aim of the Directive, as stated in its recital no. 4, was to foster creativity and grow [...]

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