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Everything you always wanted to know about private copying but were afraid to ask (Case C-463/12 Copydan Båndkopi v Nokia Danmark A/S)

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On March 5, 2015 the Court of Justice of the European Union (the ‘Court’ or ‘CJEU’) ruled on Case C-463/12 Copydan Båndkopi v Nokia Danmark A/S (‘Copydan’). The case marks the seventh occasion on which the Court has ruled on the issue of the private copying limitation under art. 5(2)(b) Directive 2001/29/EC (the ‘Directive’), following Padawan, Stichting de Thuiskopie, Luksan, VG Wort, Amazon.com and, most recently, ACI Adam. Currently, at least two more cases are pending: C-572/13 Hewlett-Packard and C-470/14 Egeda.

This blog post is structured as follows. Section 1 briefly discusses Copydan’s background and facts, while clarifying the issues examined by the Advocate Ge [...]

Russia’s New Anti-piracy Law. Throwing the Baby out with the Bath Water?

Svetlana YakovlevaOn 1 May 2015 a new, second, ‘anti-piracy’ law [1] will take effect in Russia. This law amends the provisions on preliminary interim blocking injunctions for intermediaries introduced by the first anti-piracy law, which took effect on 1 August 2013.

In the opinion of this blogger, the new law, like its predecessor, will barely affect internet piracy in Russia. It is not a secret that both providers and consumers of pirated content are well equipped to circumvent the injunctions. But what about the ordinary internet users, i.e. innocent website owners? The provisions of both anti-piracy laws are so ambiguous, and procedures for introducing and enforcing injunctions are so straightforward [...]

Austria: UPC-Telekabel II/kino.to, Supreme Court of Justice of Austria, 4 Ob 71/14s, 24 June 2014

On June 24, 2014, the Austrian Supreme Court ruled that the Austrian internet service provider UPC Telekabel Wien GmbH must block access to copyright infringing websites.  The Supreme Court noted that, in accordance with the ruling of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Case C-314/12, such an injunction leaves its addressee to determine the specific measures to be taken in order to achieve the result sought. This way the internet service provider can choose to put in place measures which are best adapted to the resources and abilities available to him and which are compatible with the other obligations and challenges which he will encounter in the exercise of his activity.

A [...]

New Turkish Construction Regulations Impair the Copyright Protection on Architectural Works

Emre BayamlıoğluA brief outline of the copyright protection granted for architectural designs

In Article 2/1,  the Berne Convention counts architectural works, together with plans, sketches and three-dimensional works relative to architecture, as copyrightable subject matter.

Turkish law treats architectural creations in two different categories: as “literary works” and “works of fine art”. Accordingly, under Law No 5846 on Artistic and Intellectual Works, the architectural work itself and the plans, sketches and three-dimensional works relative to architecture are classed as two different types of work.

Article 4 of Law No 5846 titled “Works of Fine Art” grants copyright protection to archite [...]

Why the reform of the Spanish law has been contested in the Spanish Constitutional Court

Pablo HernandezThe latest large-scale reform of the Spanish Copyright Act was published on 5 November 2014.  The key aspects of the reform are discussed here.  The bulk of the opposition to the reform contends that two provisions of the Act, namely, the new regulation for private copying and the imposition of a “one-stop shop” system, breach the Spanish Constitution.    

The current Spanish governing party decided as soon as they came to power, at the end of 2011, to abolish private copy payments by consumers in Spain in order to fulfil a campaign pledge to voters.  Since no one wanted to make private copying into an illegal practice, the solution was to keep the copyright limit and to add the [...]

US: Gaylord v. U.S., United States Court of Appeals, Federal Circuit, No. 2014-5020, 4 February 2015

Please click here to find US copyright cases from the U.S. Supreme Court, the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the U.S. Circuit Courts of Appeals with a detailed summary of each case.

Recently added from our US IP Law Daily service:

Gaylord v. U.S., United States Court of Appeals, Federal Circuit, No. 2014-5020, 4 February 2015

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has held that $540,000 was a reasonable royalty for the United States to pay on infringing commemorative stamps that the U.S. Postal Service had sold to collectors (Gaylord v. U.S., February 4, 2015, Taranto, R.). The stamps were created to commemorate the service of Korean War veterans, but they in [...]

CJEU: Mere Accessibility of Websites Enough for Jurisdiction

Martin HusovecIs the mere accessibility of a copyright infringing website sufficient to establish jurisdiction in a Member State? The Court of Justice of the European Union says a resounding “yes” in Pez Hejduk C-441/13.

The decision does not come as a big surprise, given the earlier (in)famous Pinckney C-170/12 ruling (reported on this blog here) – the ruling which many were refusing to believe was true. But it is. Pez Hejduk clears up any doubts.

Ms Hejduk is an author of photographic works depicting the buildings of the Austrian architect, Georg W. Reinberg. The defendant – EnergieAgentur – used Ms Hejduk’s photographs on its “.de” website. Taking the view that her copyright had been infringed, [...]

Italy: Buma di Paolo Buscema v Data Bridge, Supreme Court of Cassation of Italy, 13524/2014, 13 June 2014

The Italian Supreme Court confirmed that software which derives from a pre-existing computer program is eligible for copyright protection provided it demonstrates a minimal level of originality, even if it reproduces the main structure of the pre-existing program.

A full summary of this case has been published on Kluwer IP Law

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Job Posting: Associate Editor Kluwer Copyright Blog and Landmark EU Copyright Cases

By Kluwer Law International

Kluwer Law International is looking for an Associate Editor for the Kluwer Copyright Blog (the blog you are reading now) and for our Landmark EU Copyright Cases project.

The Associate Editor will report directly to the editorial team at Kluwer Law International, and will work closely with the Editor-in-chief, Dr. Lucie Guibault of the Institute for Information Law of the University of Amsterdam (IViR).

Essential duties of the Associate Editor for the Kluwer Copyright Blog include:

  • collecting, editing and reviewing blog submissions of guest contributors
  • coordinating blog post of permanent contributors
  • writing regular blog posts
  • assisting the editorial team with st [...]
Last chance to vote

blog-poll--levies-2May we have your votes please?  We are about to close the our opinion poll on private copying levies and would like to ask the last floating voters to make up their minds, to urge the procrastinating voters to just do it already and to kindly ask everybody else who hasn’t voted yet to spare us a few minutes and give us their esteemed opinion on the subject.

Private copying levies benefit all parties concerned, according to the European Parliament. But do they really? Does the internal market require a harmonised private copying system? Who should pay the levies, manufacturers, importers or retailers? Should anti-piracy campaigns be replaced with ‘positive’ campaigns? Should the system [...]

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